Helen Cullen’s The Lost Letters of William Woolf #review

This is a fascinating tale, taking as its starting point a fascinating location – the place where lost letters, those with illegible or incomplete postal addresses, end up. ‘Lost letters have only one hope for survival. If they are caught between two worlds, with an unclear destination and no address of sender, the lucky ones … Continue reading Helen Cullen’s The Lost Letters of William Woolf #review

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70 Reviews: 6. The View From Mount Improbable by Richard Dawkins (Pocket Penguins) #review

I’m so far out of my comfort zone with this one that the edge of the comfort zone is a dim hazy blur on the horizon. This, together with the fact that I suspect I have the ‘certain kind of literary mind’ that Dawkins takes a shot at in his second paragraph, means that I … Continue reading 70 Reviews: 6. The View From Mount Improbable by Richard Dawkins (Pocket Penguins) #review

Elisabeth Hobbes’ Beguiled by the Forbidden Knight #review

  As I’ve said elsewhere, I’m not really a Romance kind of reader these days – although some of my all-time favourites have contained a large dollop of the stuff and so I probably need to qualify that statement somewhat – but I will always pick up one of Elisabeth Hobbes’ novels. They’re so full … Continue reading Elisabeth Hobbes’ Beguiled by the Forbidden Knight #review

Lauren Wolk’s Wolf Hollow – truth and loyalties in 1940s America #review

This moving and tautly-constructed tale of secrets and damaged characters is an excellent read for young and old(er) adults alike. From the opening line, ‘The year I turned twelve, I learned how to lie’, we’re in the hands of an accomplished storyteller, and one who isn’t afraid to pull her punches when it comes to … Continue reading Lauren Wolk’s Wolf Hollow – truth and loyalties in 1940s America #review

70 Reviews: 5. Innocent House by P.D. James (Pocket Penguins) #review

Whereas the other volumes covered so far in this boxset series have worked well as stand-alones, this one is definitely a teaser and I’m going to hunting out the complete novel, Original Sin, as soon as I’ve finished this review. And here comes reading-confession-time again – this is the first time I’ve read a PD … Continue reading 70 Reviews: 5. Innocent House by P.D. James (Pocket Penguins) #review

70 Reviews: 4. Summer in Algiers by Albert Camus (Pocket Penguins) #review

I had read some of Camus’ novels (in translation – my GCSE French textbook, the marvellous Tricolor, didn’t cover existential thought) and loved them. I had not, however, spent much time with his essays. This is another brilliant thing about this Penguin boxset challenge – I’m reading things I might otherwise have passed over because … Continue reading 70 Reviews: 4. Summer in Algiers by Albert Camus (Pocket Penguins) #review

Nicole Harkin’s Tilting #BlogBlitz #Review

I guess that everyone has a moment in their childhood when they suddenly realise that what is normal in their house doesn’t necessarily happen in other homes. Usually this is something minor, something that ultimately becomes a familiar routine or in-joke. However, for some, this realisation can be more stark, more defining in terms of … Continue reading Nicole Harkin’s Tilting #BlogBlitz #Review

70 Reviews: 2. Cogs in the Great Machine by Eric Schlosser (Pocket Penguins)

An extract from his 2001 Fast Food Nation, Book 2 in the Penguin 70s collection is a damning exposé of safety practices in the meat industry of rural America. An investigative journalist, Schlosser has used his words to lay bare the mistreatment of workers and the abuses of power within this section of the mass-market … Continue reading 70 Reviews: 2. Cogs in the Great Machine by Eric Schlosser (Pocket Penguins)