Reading an ‘abridged and simplified’ Wuthering Heights at the age of ten

Gran lived near Rochdale and so my childhood summer holidays were largely spent in and around this area. Places like Skipton Castle, Hollingworth Lake and Haworth seemed infinitely more fascinating than anything our dull semi-industrialised Welsh valley offered and so I guess I was already predisposed to love anything that linked me to Gran and … Continue reading Reading an ‘abridged and simplified’ Wuthering Heights at the age of ten

The Second Footman by Jasper Barry #Blogtour #review

This is an ambitious start to a trilogy set in 19th Century France – Barry writes with precision and enormous detail, enabling his reader to see his characters so clearly. From the outset, we are left in no doubt that this will be a tale of intrigue and scandal: ‘Just as a pretty parlour maid … Continue reading The Second Footman by Jasper Barry #Blogtour #review

Helen Cullen’s The Lost Letters of William Woolf #review

This is a fascinating tale, taking as its starting point a fascinating location – the place where lost letters, those with illegible or incomplete postal addresses, end up. ‘Lost letters have only one hope for survival. If they are caught between two worlds, with an unclear destination and no address of sender, the lucky ones … Continue reading Helen Cullen’s The Lost Letters of William Woolf #review

70 Reviews: 6. The View From Mount Improbable by Richard Dawkins (Pocket Penguins) #review

I’m so far out of my comfort zone with this one that the edge of the comfort zone is a dim hazy blur on the horizon. This, together with the fact that I suspect I have the ‘certain kind of literary mind’ that Dawkins takes a shot at in his second paragraph, means that I … Continue reading 70 Reviews: 6. The View From Mount Improbable by Richard Dawkins (Pocket Penguins) #review

Lauren Wolk’s Wolf Hollow – truth and loyalties in 1940s America #review

This moving and tautly-constructed tale of secrets and damaged characters is an excellent read for young and old(er) adults alike. From the opening line, ‘The year I turned twelve, I learned how to lie’, we’re in the hands of an accomplished storyteller, and one who isn’t afraid to pull her punches when it comes to … Continue reading Lauren Wolk’s Wolf Hollow – truth and loyalties in 1940s America #review