Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss

Sarah Moss does a fine line in subtle violence, both physical and psychological. In Ghost Wall, a teenage girl, Sylvie, is spending her summer on an experimental archaeological site with her parents, a group of university students, and their professor. The opening chapter, however, takes us back to a much earlier voice, that of a … Continue reading Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss

Jo Nesbo’s Macbeth – drugs, corruption, and dangerous ambition.

Forming part of the Hogarth Shakespeare project, Jo Nesbo’s Macbeth is a masterclass in how to keep your reader gripped, even when the tale you’re telling is so well-known. It’s never been one of my favourite plays to teach (I think I have to thank KS3 SATs for that), but this version, set in a … Continue reading Jo Nesbo’s Macbeth – drugs, corruption, and dangerous ambition.

Man Booker 2018 – Washington Black by Esi Edugyan #review

Beginning on a slave plantation in 1830s Barbados, before embarking on a whirlwind adventure spanning the globe, Washington Black follows the life and travels of a young slave who has a talent for scientific observation. The eponymous hero is plucked from a life of brutality and fear to act as assistant to the liberal-thinking brother … Continue reading Man Booker 2018 – Washington Black by Esi Edugyan #review

Man Booker 2018 – Robin Robertson’s The Long Take #review

Shortlisted for the Man Booker this year, Robertson’s The Long Take manages to be both a sweeping view of post-war American, a victorious country in a state of internal turmoil, and an intimate account of a veteran’s struggle with what he has seen and done. Told in narrative free verse, Robertson’s novel is breathtaking in … Continue reading Man Booker 2018 – Robin Robertson’s The Long Take #review