70 Reviews: 8. Nothing Bad Ever Happens in Tiffany’s – Marian Keyes (Pocket Penguins)

I'm a firm believer in every book having its day. I'd started this series of reviews back in June 2018, keen to work my way through Penguin's boxed 70th Birthday collection that doubles up as a doorstop. It's a brilliant set of reads, usually from longer books, that draws upon Penguin's long and varied history … Continue reading 70 Reviews: 8. Nothing Bad Ever Happens in Tiffany’s – Marian Keyes (Pocket Penguins)

Lissa Evans’ Old Baggage – simply marvellous.

Mattie Simpkin is a brilliant character. There’s been so much written on the fight for female emancipation, both in fiction and elsewhere, but Evans’ novel, set in 1928, is a moving and often very funny account of what a woman like Mattie, an ardent suffragette and unflagging campaigner for equality, does next. ‘Mattie wore her … Continue reading Lissa Evans’ Old Baggage – simply marvellous.

Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman – my 10 favourite bits of an all-round bloody marvellous read.

This could be a very short review – essentially, I absolutely love this book and everyone should read it – but I thought I’d attempt to prepare for the forthcoming series by re-reading it for the millionth time and then listing my very favourite bits. If I were to do just that, I’d end up … Continue reading Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman – my 10 favourite bits of an all-round bloody marvellous read.

70 Reviews: 7. On Shopping by India Knight (Pocket Penguins) #review

I’m thoroughly enjoying my trawl through my Penguin boxset, and no. 7 is such a joy to read. I’ve been under canvas for much of the summer, relying on shower blocks to maintain a slim sense of personal hygiene and wearing eight items of clothing on rotation, so this was the perfect book to bring … Continue reading 70 Reviews: 7. On Shopping by India Knight (Pocket Penguins) #review

Angela Carter’s The Bloody Chamber – vivid retellings of old tales

There’s a knowing playfulness with which Angela Carter handles gothic conventions in her collection of tales in The Bloody Chamber. From the virginal bride in the titular story being carried south to her new husband’s castle, ‘the pounding of my heart mimicking that of the great pistons ceaselessly thrusting the train that bore me through … Continue reading Angela Carter’s The Bloody Chamber – vivid retellings of old tales

Madam Tulip and the Bones of Chance – Review and a conversation with David Ahern

David Ahern's Derry O'Donnell, together with her fortune-reading alter-ego Madam Tulip, is now on her third adventure, this time in the highlands of Scotland. I was very happy to see that familiar characters are back - there's much to love about Derry's opportunistic father, this time embroiled in buying an ancestral home, and Derry's ever … Continue reading Madam Tulip and the Bones of Chance – Review and a conversation with David Ahern