Just Bea – Deborah Klée #Blogtour

On the face of things, Bea Stevens is very different to Deborah Klée’s previous heroine, Angie, in The Borrowed Boy. But scratch a little deeper and there are similarities – Bea may well have learned to adopt a glossy veneer, but she still feels very much the outsider looking in at the prestigious Hartleys department … Continue reading Just Bea – Deborah Klée #Blogtour

The Summer Abroad – Ivan Brave

'It surprised me how wasted I was and how early it seemed. Half of Italy in one day, how much had we skipped? And yet we continued to blaze through.' Apologies in advance for the brevity of this review - it's down to the all-consuming day job, I'm afraid, but I have finally made time … Continue reading The Summer Abroad – Ivan Brave

The Way Past Winter by Kiran Millwood Hardgrave #review

‘It was a winter they would tell tales about. A winter that arrived so sudden and sharp it stuck birds to branches, and caught the rivers in such a frost their spray froze and scattered down like clouded crystals on the stilled water. A winter that came, and never left.’ When Mila’s snowy home is … Continue reading The Way Past Winter by Kiran Millwood Hardgrave #review

Alice Broadway’s Spark – the power of a story brilliantly told.

In her TED talk, The Danger of a Single Story, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie explores the power of storytelling to shape the narrative of a group of people. To know only one story, one version of events, is to remain ignorant, or worse. In Spark, Alice Broadway’s second novel and a follow up her to her … Continue reading Alice Broadway’s Spark – the power of a story brilliantly told.

Pam Smy’s Thornhill – brilliantly creepy

From the first pages, festooned with barbed wire, the stage is set for a dark treat in Pam Smy's Thornhill, a hybrid novel/graphic novel which has been shortlisted for Waterstones' Children's Book Prize in the Older Fiction category. The book itself is physically striking - the cover's silhouettes and the black-edged pages create an object … Continue reading Pam Smy’s Thornhill – brilliantly creepy

Books by Ballot – Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express

I turned to my Agatha Christie shelves for this week’s twitter poll over at @moyle3, spurred on by a trailer for Branagh’s new Murder on the Orient Express. This novel was up against N or M? (I do love Tommy and Tuppence) and Destination Unknown, one of the few Christie novels to not feature Poirot, … Continue reading Books by Ballot – Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express

Helen Matthews’ After Leaving the Village – a gripping tale for our times

Helen Matthews’ debut novel makes for very compelling reading indeed. As with the subject of my last review, Ali Smith’s Autumn, After Leaving the Village is very much a novel of our times, our lives, even if it initially feels that this is a situation fortunately far beyond most people’s comprehension. As alluded to in … Continue reading Helen Matthews’ After Leaving the Village – a gripping tale for our times