Tea is So Intoxicating – Mary Essex (British Library Women Writers)

To my shame, this is the first time I’ve read Ursula Bloom in any of her many authorial guises. As Mary Essex, Bloom wrote at least eight books (that I can find) and here provides us with a somewhat spiky rural village comedy. Not many of her characters are particularly likeable, and she has a … Continue reading Tea is So Intoxicating – Mary Essex (British Library Women Writers)

Father – Elizabeth von Arnim (British Library Women Writers)

Literature is full of overbearing or manipulative fathers - Dr Sloper in Henry James' Washington Square springs to mind - and Richard Dodge, the father of this 1931 novel, is up there with the finest. From a young age, Jennifer has looked after and supported her widowed father, typing up his manuscripts and maintaining his … Continue reading Father – Elizabeth von Arnim (British Library Women Writers)

The Silk Merchant’s Convenient Wife – Elisabeth Hobbes

With The Silk Merchant’s Convenient Wife, Elisabeth Hobbes has shown that she is just as at home writing a Victorian romance as she is with the Medieval period. In this, her tenth novel, we meet Jonathan Harcourt and Aurelia Upford. Both of them have their own reasons for wanting a purely business-like marriage, and Hobbes … Continue reading The Silk Merchant’s Convenient Wife – Elisabeth Hobbes

Dangerous Ages – Rose Macaulay (British Library Women Writers)

Waking on her 43rd birthday, Neville takes a moment to herself. And as most women know, it is these snatched moments of quiet which restore, however briefly, a sense of one’s own identity. ‘Swimming, bread and marmalade, sitting high in a beech tree in the golden eye of the morning sun – that was life. … Continue reading Dangerous Ages – Rose Macaulay (British Library Women Writers)